Autism

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Improvements with Sensory Enrichment Therapy™

Parents have noticed dramatic differences in their child’s impairments and abilities:

  • Improved interactions with friends
  • Greater focus and engagement
  • Initiating natural conversations*
  • A more confident learner
  • Increased connection between parent and child
  • Higher I.Q.*
  • Reduced anxiety
  • Less bothered by textures, sounds, etc.*
  • Better ability to cope with transitions
  • Restful and less interrupted sleep
  • More interest in varied foods
  • Better eye contact
  • Progress reported across all ages including teens and young adults

Effective Autism Therapy

As seen in randomized controlled trials

Results in these independent studies show that 42% of the children in the enrichment group achieved clinically significant improvements on the CARS scale, vs. 7% in the standard care group. Other results:

  • 21% fell below ADOS cutoff for autism after 6 months (2)
  • Higher I.Q. by more than 10 points (1,2)
  • Progress consistent across all age groups (1-18 yrs.) (3)
 
 

Cheap Autism Therapy

Includes unlimited access to a dedicated therapy coach

  • No contract
  • No special equipment required
  • Video instructions
  • Track your child’s improvement
  • Parent exchange forum
 
 

Easily Accessible Home Based Autism Therapy

Quality time. Stronger bonds. Better brain.

Because of the powerful nature of Sensory Enrichment Therapy™ it only needs to take a few minutes each day. Just as physical exercise helps the body, a short, structured workout every day will gradually build and enhance your brain functioning.

 
 

  1. Woo, C., & Leon, M. (2013). Environmental enrichment as an effective treatment for autism: A randomized controlled trial. Behavioral Neuroscience, 487-497.
  2. Woo, C. C., Donnelly, J. H., Steinberg-Epstein, R., & Leon, M. (2015). Environmental enrichment as a therapy for autism: A clinical trial replication and extension. Behavioral Neuroscience, 129(4), 412–422.
  3. Aronoff E., Hillyer R., and Leon M., Environmental Enrichment Therapy for Autism: Outcomes with Increased Access, Neural Plasticity, vol. 2016, Article ID 2734915, 23 pages, 2016
 
 

Only someone who has a child with Autism understands what it is like

Below are a few examples from the 500 possible protocols you could be prescribed.

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There are many factors involved in selecting the best protocols for you to do each time. Which protocols you are prescribed depends not only on age, strengths, and challenges but also on where the brain is ready to make improvements.

Katie is a health professional. Hear why she recommends Mendability. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zqtB-5zgzE Sensory Enrichment Therapy™ is a scientifically driven treatment that uses sensory experiences to enable the brain to reduce the symptoms of autism. Environmental Enrichment improves brain plasticity and increases brain development. As brain functions improve, the challenges we face start to decrease. In clinical trials, 42% of the children in the enrichment group achieved clinically significant improvement after 6 months vs. 7% in the standard care group. Sensory Enrichment Therapy™ is a scientifically-driven treatment that uses sensory experiences to enable the brain to reduce the symptoms of developmental delays. Brain Plasticity The brain is an amazing organism. Along with other parts of the body, its ability to grow, heal, and adapt are incredible. The human brain is amazing. Along with other parts of the body, its ability to grow, heal, and adapt are remarkable. It can rewire itself to adapt to the environment. Click Here to Get Started

What is Sensory Enrichment Therapy™?

Sensory Enrichment Therapy is an evidence-based treatment that uses sensory experiences to enable the brain to reduce the symptoms of autism. The treatment involves sensorimotor exercises that concurrently stimulate two or more senses such as olfactory, tactile, visual, balance, motor systems, etc.

Temple Grandin PhD, describes it this way:

Environmental enrichment is an innovative therapy that is easy and simple to do. It may help many children. Environmental enrichment has three innovative features:

  1. Always changing the stimulus
  2. Stimulating two senses simultaneously
  3. One of the sense is always either smell or touch

Environmental enrichment leads to better brains

Animal studies and autism research have shown for a very long time that an enriched environment that provides more sensory and motor experiences leads to improvements in brain development. In 1947 Donald Hebb found that rats raised as pets performed better on problem-solving tests than rats raised in cages (1). In the 1960’s Mark Rosenzweig showed the measurable differences between the brains of rats raised in small cages, and the brains of rats that had access to all sorts of toys and could play with other rats. Rosenzweig established that environmental enrichment increased the size and weight of their brains. The brains of the enriched rats had more brain cells, more connections, and a stronger auxiliary system to support this enhanced brain activity (2).


  1. Hebb DO (1947). “The effects of early experience on problem solving at maturity”. American Psychologist 2: 306–7.
  2. Krech D, Rosenzweig MR, Bennett EL (December 1960). “Effects of environmental complexity and training on brain chemistry”. J Comp Physiol Psychol 53 (6): 509–19.

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Sensory pairings are key

Over the next 20 – 30 years, researchers looked into which aspects of an enriched environment have an impact on rodents’ behavior and neurological development. These scientists demonstrated that sensory experiences are key (1,2,3,4). Moreover, scientists discovered that combining sensory inputs leads to additional improvements in brain development, especially when combining smell and touch (5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12).


  1. van Praag, H., Kempermann, G., & Gage, F. H. (2000). Neural consequences of environmental enrichment. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 1, 191–198. doi:10.1038/35044558
  2. Nithianantharajah, J., & Hannan, A. J. (2006). Enriched environments, experience-dependent plasticity and disorders of the nervous system. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 7, 697–709. doi:10.1038/nrn1970
  3. Laviola, G., Hannan, A. J., Macri, S., Solinas, M., & Jaber, M. (2008). Effects of enriched environment on animal models of neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. Neurobiology of Disorders, 31, 159 – 168. doi:10.1016/j.nbd.2008.05.001
  4. Pang, T. Y., & Hannan, A. J. (2013). Enhancement of cognitive function in models of brain disease through environmental enrichment and physical activity. Neuropharmacology, 64, 515–528.
  5. Sullivan, R. M., Taborsky-Barba, S., Mendoza, R., Itano, A., Leon, M., Cotman, C. W., . . . Lott, I. (1991). Olfactory classical conditioning in neonates. Pediatrics, 87, 511–518
  6. Coopersmith, R., Weihmuller, F., Kirstein, C., Marshall, J., & Leon, M. (1991). Extracellular dopamine increases in the neonatal olfactory bulb during odor preference training. Brain Research, 564(1), 149-153.
  7. Rangel, S., & Leon, M. (1995). Early odor preference training increases olfactory bulb norepinephrine. Developmental Brain Research, 85, 187– 191.
  8. Sullivan, R. M., Wilson, D. A., & Leon, M. (1989). Norepinephrine and learning-induced plasticity in infant rat olfactory system. Journal of Neuroscience, 9, 3998–4006
  9. Wilson, D. A., Sullivan, R. M., & Leon, M. (1987). Single-unit analysis of postnatal olfactory learning: Modified olfactory bulb output response patterns to learned attractive odors. Journal of Neuroscience, 7, 3154– 3162.
  10. Woo, C. C., Coopersmith, R., & Leon, M. (1987). Localized changes in olfactory bulb morphology associated with early olfactory learning. Journal of Comparative Neurology, 263, 113–125.
  11. Woo, C. C., & Leon, M. (1991). Increase in a focal population of juxtaglomerular cells in the olfactory bulb associated with early learning. Journal of Comparative Neurology, 305, 49–56.
  12. Veyrac, A., Sacquet, J., Nguyen, V., Marien, M., Jourdan, F., & Didier, A. (2009). Novelty determines the effects of olfactory enrichment on mem- ory and neurogenesis through noradrenergic mechanisms. Neuropsycho- pharmacology, 34, 786–795.

Early implementation in humans

In the 1990’s Claudie Pomares, MSEd used the existing research on environmental enrichment to develop a program of sensory enrichment to help children. After 20 years of consistent results in numerous case studies, two randomized controlled studies have now been published validating Sensory Enrichment Therapy™ as a basis for a new treatment model for children with autism 1, 2. Further studies are currently underway extending our understanding of the effectiveness of this approach as an autism intervention, as well as exploring the benefits of Sensory Enrichment Therapy™ for ADHD and other neurological disorders. Claudie Pomares

Clinically proven therapy

Results showed that after 6 months of therapy 42% of the children in the sensory enrichment group achieved clinically significant improvement of 5 points on the CARS scale, compared to only 7% of the children in the standard care group. Remarkably, 21% of the children in the sensory enrichment group who initially had been classified as having classic autism using the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule improved to a level below the autism classification cut-off. None of the children in the control group improved to that extent.

  After 6 months of therapy, 42% of the children in the sensory enrichment group achieved clinically significant improvement, compared to only 7% of the children in the standard care group. 21% of Sensorimotor-Enriched children and 0% of Standard-Care children fell below the autism cutoff score after 6 months

Percent of individuals with clinical improvement on the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS)
Percent of individuals who fell below the autism cutoff score after 6 months.

  1. Woo, C., & Leon, M. (2013). Environmental enrichment as an effective treatment for autism: A randomized controlled trial. Behavioral Neuroscience, 487-497.
  2. Woo, C. C., Donnelly, J. H., Steinberg-Epstein, R., & Leon, M. (2015). Environmental enrichment as a therapy for autism: A clinical trial replication and extension. Behavioral Neuroscience, 129(4), 412–422.

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