Testimonials

Testimonials and Reviews

More testimonials

Bobby (Autism)
Omar (Autism)
Walter (Autism)
Gabriel (Autism)
Ariel (PDD NOS)
Tommy (Down syndrome & Autism)
Ethan (Autism)
Matthew and Zachary (Autism)

 

Speech-Language Pathology
Andy and Alex (2 boys Autism)
Ruth (Young adult with Autism)
Alexander (Autism)
Cade (Autism)
Mitchell (Autism)
Max (Down syndrome)
Kayla (Autism)
Angus (Autism)
Connor (Autism)
Mabel (Anxiety)
Lori & Family (A.D.D., Depression, Anxiety, Dementia)
Luke (Autism)
Video: William (ADHD)
Video: Sherri, son with Pervasive Development Disorder (PDD-NOS)
Video: Moms, Dads, Doctors and Professionals

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14 thoughts on “Testimonials

  1. RL

    I have a 2 year 9 month old daughter recently diagnosed with autism. She also has sensory processing disorder and dysphagia (100% g-tube fed). She was reading as an infant and has perfect pitch. She knew her colors, the alphabet, and numbers as an infant, as well. Her receptive language skills seem pretty good. She speaks using echolalia and some self generated language. She makes great eye contact, responds to her name, and brings “treasures” to show us. I’m nervous about Mendability working for us because she does not do anything anyone requests. Hand over hand is filled with screams and shouts of “no!”. We don’t know if she can’t put a square block in a square hole or if she simply doesn’t want to do it. She has strong oppositional defiance. Even if it is something she wants to do she won’t do it, if you ask her to. She recently started ABA and they said the have never seen a child stand for 4 hours rather than sitting in the chair. They’ve been trying to get her to sit in the chair for two months! Are there exercises (or variations) that would work for her? We honestly don’t know what she knows or not!

    Reply
    1. Kim Post author

      Hi RL, (or should i call you Corrine’s Mommy?)

      I would recommend you call in and ask to speak to one of our expert therapists about the oppositional defiant behaviors and the feeding. The therapy is likely to help her become interested and able to feed herself solids and the transition period will have to be managed very carefully.

      Regarding the defiance, I can say that there is a good chance it won’t be a problem for very long with Sensory Enrichment Therapy. You see, many of the exercises, and I am confident at least one exercise in each one of the worksheets you will get for your daughter, trigger activity and growth near or in the reward centers in the brain. It’s common for the kids on the program to start asking for their therapy session after a few weeks. It’s important for the purposes of our therapy to trigger activity in that area to “motivate” the brain to do the hard work that it is to start “growing and repairing.”

      So, hopefully, the defiance will not affect the therapy in the short term. In the long term, defiance is one symptoms that should start to disappear after a few months. Everyone is different, of course, and we will not know for sure until we have done the therapy with her, but parents report major improvements in their child’s behavior, social skills, communication and motivation levels, which all have an impact on oppositional defiant behaviors.

      As for her G-Tube, we have not had too many of those do the program so the stats are not significant, but a good portion of them so far were able to feed themselves solid foods. Again, transitioning is a delicate matter and has to be supervised by a local professional. When/If you sign up for this program, make sure the doctor who monitors her feeding is made aware that she is likely to start to show signs that she is interested in eating, chewing, swallowing, etc. in the near future as her brain develops more with this new therapy program.

      Since there is a small chance that the whole thing could flop because she will give you a hard time, let’s start with the month-to-month subscription and then if she latches onto the program, then we can see about the more cost-effective, long term commitment options.

      What do you say?

      On the program you will have access to your therapist any time to discuss strategies.

      Reply
    1. Kim Post author

      Yes, Fahad. You can access Mendability wherever you have a connection to the Internet and a phone. Even the phone is not absolutely necessary with programs like Skype. Skype and other video conferencing programs are really good when we want to see your child or when you want to make sure you are doing an exercise right.

      Reply
  2. M

    My son struggles with conversation. You can see it in his eyes the thought process to answer question the, but his answers seem to get stuck and garbled. He eventually gets his point across but his peers usually have given up and just kinda push him along and not really understanding him. My question is, can this program help his receptive and expressive language? Does it help with math concepts and reading comprehension, vocabulary, spelling? These areas where he is a year behind his peers.

    Reply
    1. Kim Post author

      Yes, you can see it in the Video testimonial: TEDx: Autism, Journey of Hope. Leya was very close to where your son is today. Sensory Enrichment gives the brain the capacity to compensate for a wide range of challenges, including speech processing delays. It also helps abstract concepts like Math by helping the brain build up the part that handles abstract concepts like “future, value of money, meaning of symbols, etc” This is an area where Sensory Enrichment therapy does well.

      Reply
    1. Kim Post author

      Yes, helping a child to regulate his own emotions is one of the ways that Sensory Enrichment therapy helps. In fact we are broadcasting a webinar at the moment on the subject. You should have a look:

      http://www.mendability.com/how-it-works/new-cost-effective-clinically-proven-autism-therapy/

      Of course, aggression means he will be less able to cooperate and do the exercises. When you sign up you will be assigned to a coach/therapist that will work with you to figure out a schedule of exercises that will help him feel more relaxed but not require him to do “therapy” sessions and avoid the frustration of not being able to do therapy properly. We can work with you to blend Sensory Enrichment protocols into his day-to-day activities. When his aggression has decreased, then we will start introducing brain building sessions.

      Reply
  3. Preeti

    am very impressed and inspired by the testimonials. Am very keen on starting the same therapy for my daughter too.

    Reply
    1. Kim Post author

      Thanks Preeti. Let’s see if we can help your daughter. What would you say is her biggest challenge?

      Reply
    1. Kim Post author

      The clinical studies of the effectiveness of Mendability were done on children with autism aged 3 to 12 years old. So we need more hard data to confirm its effectiveness on older children. I know they are raising funds for a large scale study that would include over 1,000 cases aged 3 to 18. That will be great but it will take a few years for the results to be published. In the meantime, the theory suggests that it should work just as well. In fact, we have observed that older children with autism “get it” more easily and they get more motivated to keep up with the therapy when they understand and feel the benefits of this treatment.

      Reply
      1. J. Kroetch

        Do you think this therapy would help a 20 yr. old with autism? He didn’t do well academically, but can read at a grade 3 level and do simple math. He also has his driver’s license. He is social, but doesn’t get the subtleties of social interaction.

        Reply
        1. Kim Post author

          Yes, Sensory Enrichment therapy is about building up the brain’s abilities.

          When you fill out a questionnaire, we can detect where his brain is ready for improvement. We then give you the best exercises we have to increase plasticity and support healthy development there.

          After you have done these exercises for a couple of weeks, you fill out a new progress questionnaire, we find where he is ready to go next and give you a new set of exercises… And so on, until you want to stop doing therapy with your son. :-)

          Reply

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